About the Speaker

Dr. Kendall-Tackett is a health psychologist and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women’s health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Lactation, Fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology, Past President of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology, and Editor-in-Chief of Psychological Trauma. She is a Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Texas Tech University School of Medicine in Amarillo, Texas and Research Associate at the Crimes against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire.

Dr. Kendall-Tackett specializes in women’s health research including breastfeeding, depression, trauma, and health psychology. Her research interests include the psychoneuroimmunology of maternal depression and the lifetime health effects of trauma. Dr. Kendall-Tackett has won several awards for her work including the 2013 Outstanding Research Poster Award from the U.S. Lactation Consultant Association, the 2011 Community Faculty Award from the Department of Pediatrics, Texas Tech University School of Medicine, and the 2011 John Kennell and Marshall Klaus Award for Excellence in Research from DONA International (with co-recipient, Tom Hale). She has authored more than 360 articles or chapters and is the author or editor of 25 books on maternal depression, family violence and breastfeeding. Her most recent books include: A Breastfeeding-Friendly Approach to Postpartum Depression (2015), Psychology of Trauma 101 (2015), The Science of Mother-Infant Sleep (2014), Depression in New Mothers, 2nd Edition (2010), The Psychoneuroimmunology of Chronic Disease (2010), Trauma & Physical Health (2009), and How to Write for a General Audience (2007). She is also co-author (with Nancy Mohrbacher) of Breastfeeding Made Simple, 2nd Edition (2010). A full listing of her books is available at UppityScienceChick.com, BreastfeedingMadeSimple.com, KathleenKendall-Tackett.com, and PraeclarusPress.com.

Official Bio for Brochure

Dr. Kendall-Tackett is a health psychologist and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women’s health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Lactation, Fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology, Past President of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology, and Editor-in-Chief of Psychological Trauma. She is a Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Texas Tech University School of Medicine in Amarillo, Texas and Research Associate at the Crimes against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire.

Dr. Kendall-Tackett specializes in women’s health research including breastfeeding, depression, trauma, and health psychology. Her research interests include the psychoneuroimmunology of maternal depression and the lifetime health effects of trauma.

Bio for Introduction

Dr. Kendall-Tackett is a health psychologist and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women’s health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Lactation, Fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology, Past President of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology, and Editor-in-Chief of Psychological Trauma. She is a Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Texas Tech University School of Medicine in Amarillo, Texas and Research Associate at the Crimes against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire.

Dr. Kendall-Tackett specializes in women’s health research including breastfeeding, depression, trauma, and health psychology. Her research interests include the psychoneuroimmunology of maternal depression and the lifetime health effects of trauma.




Presentations

Burnout, Compassion Fatigue, and Self-Care for Members of the Perinatal Team

Time-frame: 60-90
CERP: yes

Working in perinatal care can be deeply rewarding. It can also lead to job-related burnout and secondary traumatic stress. Secondary traumatic stress, or compassion fatigue, can occur when witnessing traumatic events in the workplace. This can occur when witnessing infant death or traumatic births, or when there is too much work, or work that doesn’t seem to make a difference, and little institutional support. A recent survey by AWHONN of 464 Labor & Delivery nurses found that more than a third reported moderate-to-severe symptoms of traumatic stress as a result of incidents they encountered on the job. This has serious implications for both patients and providers. Burnout and Compassion fatigue/secondary traumatic stress can lead to physical and mental health sequelae for professionals who experiences them. It can also have a negative impact on the care provided. Self-care is essential for being able to provide care to others. In this seminar, participants will learn about the causes and consequences of both burnout and secondary traumatic stress/compassion fatigue. The good news is that there is hope for recovery. Participants will learn some specific strategies for integrating self-care into their care for others.

The Neuropsychological Effects of Sleep Training and Its Implications for Breastfeeding

Time-frame: 60-90
CERP: yes

Sleep training continues to be a popular parenting philosophy with its roots in American Behaviorism. The idea behind this approach is that if you want to stop a behavior, don’t “reinforce” it, which increasing its likelihood that it reoccur. Under this school of thought, if you pick up a crying baby, you are just reinforcing the likelihood that the baby will cry more often—especially at night. Recent research has suggested that there is “no apparent harm” to this approach. But is that true? This presentation will describe recent research in neuroscience on the importance of responsive early parenting on brain development, and harmful effects of leaving babies to cry. Non-responsive parenting raises babies’ cortisol levels. Cortisol is toxic to brain cells, particularly in the hippocampus. This research is also put in the context of current AAP recommendations to keep babies in the parents’ room during the first six months, and how solitary sleep increases the babies’ risk of SIDS.

Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Infant Mortality, Breastfeeding, and Sleep Practices

Time-frame: 60-90
CERP: yes

The U.S. is now 41st in the world in infant mortality, currently ranking behind many countries that spend far less on healthcare. This low ranking is due in part to racial/ethnic group differences in infant mortality: particularly among African Americans and American Indians, with an infant death rate that is more than twice the rate of whites. In this session, you will learn about the physiology of racism and how it increases risk for health problems, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, depression, and preterm birth. Preterm birth, lower rates of breastfeeding, and unsafe sleep practices increase risk of infant mortality in vulnerable populations. Fortunately, there are ways in decrease infant mortality by helping mothers downregulate stress, and by encouraging breastfeeding and safe sleep practices that are consistent with their cultural values.

Birth Trauma: Causes & Consequences of Childbirth-Related PTSD

Time-frame: 60-90
CERP: yes

Recent studies have found that as many as 1 in 4 women have symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following their births, approximately 9% meet full criteria for PTSD. What types of symptoms do they have and how do these symptoms impact breastfeeding and women’s emotional health? In this session, you will learn about the new DSM-5 criteria for PTSD and why some types of births are more likely to cause symptoms. You will also learn how these symptoms might impact breastfeeding, and what mothers and practitioners can do to help.

Weighing in Obesity and Breastfeeding

Time-frame: 60-90
CERP: yes

Public health officials have been sounding the alarm about the “obesity epidemic,” not only in the U.S., but in industrialized nations around the world. In response, breastfeeding is offered as an important preventative measure for both maternal and childhood obesity. Unfortunately, strategies designed to improve breastfeeding rates among women with higher BMIs often backfire and become self-fulfilling prophecies by discouraging heavier women from breastfeeding. Despite these limitations, breastfeeding has an important role to play in obesity prevention. This presentation provides an overview of current research on surprising causes of obesity, such as sleep disorders, psychological trauma, and discrimination and outlines the limitations of current approaches. This session also describes research on the impact of BMI on breastfeeding, and provides practical steps for working with mothers with higher BMIs.

Breastfeeding Lowers Women’s Risk of Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease

Time-frame: 60-90
CERP: yes

Several recent large clinical trials and meta-analyses have demonstrated that breastfeeding lowers women’s lifetime risk of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease in mothers. Further, these studies have documented a dose-response effect: the longer that women breastfeed, the lower the risk. The intriguing question is why this occurs. Research from the field of health psychology provides several possible mechanisms that can explain this effect. In this session, you will learn the many ways that breastfeeding positively affects women’s health. Breastfeeding downregulates the stress response, lowers inflammation, decreases depression, improves mother’s sleep quality, decreases daytime fatigue, and even attenuates the effects of psychological trauma. Results from previous studies will be presented, as well as new data from the Survey of Mothers’ Sleep and Fatigue¸ a survey of 6,410 new mothers.

Mother-infant Sleep Location and Nighttime Feeding Behaviors

Time-frame: 60-90
CERP: yes

Healthcare providers and public health officials are increasingly telling mothers not to sleep with their babies. How is this impacting mothers’ behavior? This presentation will show U.S. data from the Survey of Mothers’ Sleep and Fatigue. The survey data provides information on where babies start and finish the night, what mothers are telling their friends, family and healthcare providers, and how they feel about their sleep arrangements. It also addresses the issue of whether the policy of asking mothers to never share a bed with their babies is having an unintended effect. Our findings show that 44% of mothers, in an effort to avoid bed sharing, are sometimes falling asleep with their babies on couches, sofas, and recliners–sleep surfaces that all sleep experts agree are dangerous for babies. This presentation will also consider the policy implications of the AAP 2011 statement of safe infant sleep, and current findings and advice given to new parents.

A New Paradigm for Depression in New Mothers

Time-frame: 75-90
CERP: yes

Recent research has revealed a surprising link between inflammation and depression. Although inflammation was first identified as a risk factor for postpartum depression in the late 1990s, researchers have recently learned that it underlies all the other risk factors. All other known causes of depression, such as pain, psychological trauma, lack of social support, or sleep problems, trigger the inflammatory response. This research tells us why women are vulnerable to depression in the last trimester of pregnancy and postpartum. It also explains the link between depression in pregnancy and preterm birth, and why breastfeeding protects maternal mood because it downregulates the stress and inflammatory response.

Nighttime Breastfeeding and Postpartum Depression

Time-frame: 60-90
CERP: yes

New mothers are often advised to avoid nighttime breastfeeding in order to prevent postpartum depression. While this advice is well-intended, no one knows if it even works. And it can be quite problematic for breastfeeding mothers to maintain. Using data from the Survey of Mothers’ Sleep and Fatigue, we examine the relationship between feeding method, depression, and maternal fatigue. Consistent with recent studies, our findings reveal that breastfeeding mothers report less fatigue, more and better quality sleep, and lower rates of depression than their formula- or mixed-feeding counterparts. Advising tired new mothers to supplement may well increase their risk of depression. This presentation also summarizes some strategies that can be used to support exhausted new mothers.

Breastfeeding Made Simple: Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers

Time-frame: 75-90
CERP: yes

Each year, hundreds of thousands of women initiate breastfeeding only to stop in the first few days or weeks postpartum. Why does this happen? In this presentation, I describe the seven natural laws for nursing mothers based on the bestselling book, Breastfeeding Made Simple, 2nd Edition (co -authored with Nancy Mohrbacher). These laws are based on the latest research from around the world and will help you work more effectively with mothers so they can have successful breastfeeding experiences.

Kathleen Kendall-Tackett Ph.D, IBCLC, FAPA


Country: USA
Phone number: 806-367-9950
Email: kkendallt@gmail.com
Site: http://www.KathleenKendall-Tackett.com
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Publications